Tech

China: video game giants in the crosshairs of power | Today Headlines | Yahoo news

China introduces new regulations on video games. Those under 18 will soon be able to play for a maximum of three hours per week. The stated objective: to fight against addictions among young people. Beijing is also seeking to control the younger generations and tighten its grip on its tech giants.

Limit video game time among young people. This is how China intends to tackle the problem of addiction to these games. Some Chinese children may spend entire days glued to their screens, which can lead to poor vision, declining school performance, and lack of physical activity. Regulations already prohibited minors from playing online between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., with manufacturers requiring them to log in with identification.

This new regulation is also a way for Beijing to keep some control over the younger generations. After Alibaba and Tencent, this is also Beijing’s latest attack on Chinese tech giants. We talk about it with Jean-Dominique Séval, founder and director of Soon Consulting and president of French Tech Beijing.

Guillaume Grallet of Le Point magazine also explains how these young people are now being pushed to migrate to alternative platforms where they can play without restrictions.

While many students around the world have returned to school, we present in Test24 several innovations to improve learning, including small memo cards that can be scanned.

China: video game giants in the crosshairs of power | Business Top Stories abc News

China: video game giants in the crosshairs of power
| Today Headlines | Today Headlines

China introduces new regulations on video games. Those under 18 will soon be able to play for a maximum of three hours per week. The stated objective: to fight against addictions among young people. Beijing is also seeking to control the younger generations and tighten its grip on its tech giants.

Limit video game time among young people. This is how China intends to tackle the problem of addiction to these games. Some Chinese children may spend entire days glued to their screens, which can lead to poor vision, declining school performance, and lack of physical activity. Regulations already prohibited minors from playing online between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., with manufacturers requiring them to log in with identification.

This new regulation is also a way for Beijing to keep some control over the younger generations. After Alibaba and Tencent, this is also Beijing’s latest attack on Chinese tech giants. We talk about it with Jean-Dominique Séval, founder and director of Soon Consulting and president of French Tech Beijing.

Guillaume Grallet of Le Point magazine also explains how these young people are now being pushed to migrate to alternative platforms where they can play without restrictions.

While many students around the world have returned to school, we present in Test24 several innovations to improve learning, including small memo cards that can be scanned.

China: video game giants in the crosshairs of power
| Business News Today Today Headlines

Jewel Beaujolie

I am a fashion designer in the past and I currently write in the fields of fashion, cosmetics, body care and women in general. I am interested in family matters and everything related to maternal, child and family health.

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